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Wipro WILP Sample Aptitude Questions and Answers

Practice sample Wipro WILP aptitude questions and answers to enhance your preparation for the placement process. Utilize this resource to sharpen your problem-solving skills and get a step closer to achieving success in your Wipro WILP placement.

Q1

Q1 Re-arrange the jumbled parts which are labelled as P, Q, R and S to produce the correct sentence. A start has been given to you as P1. Choose the proper sequence.
P1: We have to
P: as we see it
Q: speak the truth
R: there is falsehood and darkness
S: even if all around us

A

RQSP

B

QRPS

C

RSQP

D

QPSR

Q2

Q2 Re-arrange the jumbled parts which are labelled as P, Q, R and S to produce the correct sentence. The first (S1) and the sixth (S6) sentences are given in the beginning. Choose the correct option.
S1: Venice is a strange and beautiful city in the north of Italy.
P: There are about four hundred old stone bridges joining the island of Venice.
Q: In this city there are no motor cars, no horses and no buses.
R: These small islands are near one another.
S: It is not an island but a hundred and seventeen islands.
S6: This is because Venice has no streets.

A

PQRS

B

PRQS

C

SRPQ

D

PQSR

Q3

Q3 Directions for the (3-5) questions:
Read the passage given below and answer the questions.
The economic transformation of India is one of the great business stories of our time. As stifling government regulations have been lifted, entrepreneurship has flourished, and the country has become a high-powered center for information technology and pharmaceuticals. Indian companies like Infosys and Wipro are powerful global players, while Western firms like G.E. and I.B.M. now have major research facilities in India employing thousands. India's seemingly endless flow of young, motivated engineers, scientists, and managers offering developed-world skills at developing-world wages is held to be putting American jobs at risk, and the country is frequently heralded as "the next economic superpower."
But India has run into a surprising hitch on its way to superpower status: its inexhaustible supply of workers is becoming exhausted. Although, India has one of the youngest workforces on the planet, the head of Infosys said recently that there was an "acute shortage of skilled manpower," and a study projects that this year salaries for skilled workers will rise fourteen and a half per cent, a sure sign that demand for skilled labor is outstripping supply.
How is this possible in a country that every year produces two and a half million college graduates and four hundred thousand engineers? Start with the fact that just ten per cent of Indians get any kind of post-secondary education, compared with some fifty per cent who do in the U.S. Moreover, of that ten per cent, the vast majority go to one of India's seventeen thousand colleges, many of which are closer to community colleges than to four-year institutions. India does have more than three hundred universities,but a recent survey by the London Times Higher Education Supplement put only two of them among the top hundred in the world. Many Indian graduates therefore enter the workforce with a low level of skills. A current study led by Vivek Wadhwa, of Duke University, has found that if you define "engineer" by U.S. standards, India produces just a hundred and seventy thousand engineers a year, not four hundred thousand. Infosys says that, of 1.3 million applicants for jobs last year, it found only two per cent acceptable.
Which of these could you infer from the passage?

A

Wages in the developing countries are less as compared to wages in the developed countries.

B

Wages in the developing countries are more as compared to wages in the developed countries.

C

Wages in the developing countries are same as wages in the developed countries.

D

None of the above

Q4

Q4 Directions for the (3-5) questions: :
Read the passage given below and answer the questions.
The economic transformation of India is one of the great business stories of our time. As stifling government regulations have been lifted, entrepreneurship has flourished, and the country has become a high-powered center for information technology and pharmaceuticals. Indian companies like Infosys and Wipro are powerful global players, while Western firms like G.E. and I.B.M. now have major research facilities in India employing thousands. India's seemingly endless flow of young, motivated engineers, scientists, and managers offering developed-world skills at developing-world wages is held to be putting American jobs at risk, and the country is frequently heralded as "the next economic superpower."
But India has run into a surprising hitch on its way to superpower status: its inexhaustible supply of workers is becoming exhausted. Although, India has one of the youngest workforces on the planet, the head of Infosys said recently that there was an "acute shortage of skilled manpower," and a study projects that this year salaries for skilled workers will rise fourteen and a half per cent, a sure sign that demand for skilled labor is outstripping supply.
How is this possible in a country that every year produces two and a half million college graduates and four hundred thousand engineers? Start with the fact that just ten per cent of Indians get any kind of post-secondary education, compared with some fifty per cent who do in the U.S. Moreover, of that ten per cent, the vast majority go to one of India's seventeen thousand colleges, many of which are closer to community colleges than to four-year institutions. India does have more than three hundred universities,but a recent survey by the London Times Higher Education Supplement put only two of them among the top hundred in the world. Many Indian graduates therefore enter the workforce with a low level of skills. A current study led by Vivek Wadhwa, of Duke University, has found that if you define "engineer" by U.S. standards, India produces just a hundred and seventy thousand engineers a year, not four hundred thousand. Infosys says that, of 1.3 million applicants for jobs last year, it found only two per cent acceptable.
What does ‘American jobs’ in the last line of the first paragraph of the passage imply?

A

Jobs provided by American companies

B

Jobs held (or to be held) by American people

C

Jobs open to only American citizens

D

Jobs provided by the American government

Q5

Q5 Directions for the (3-5) questions:
Read the passage given below and answer the questions.
The economic transformation of India is one of the great business stories of our time. As stifling government regulations have been lifted, entrepreneurship has flourished, and the country has become a high-powered center for information technology and pharmaceuticals. Indian companies like Infosys and Wipro are powerful global players, while Western firms like G.E. and I.B.M. now have major research facilities in India employing thousands. India's seemingly endless flow of young, motivated engineers, scientists, and managers offering developed-world skills at developing-world wages is held to be putting American jobs at risk, and the country is frequently heralded as "the next economic superpower."
But India has run into a surprising hitch on its way to superpower status: its inexhaustible supply of workers is becoming exhausted. Although, India has one of the youngest workforces on the planet, the head of Infosys said recently that there was an "acute shortage of skilled manpower," and a study projects that this year salaries for skilled workers will rise fourteen and a half per cent, a sure sign that demand for skilled labor is outstripping supply.
How is this possible in a country that every year produces two and a half million college graduates and four hundred thousand engineers? Start with the fact that just ten per cent of Indians get any kind of post-secondary education, compared with some fifty per cent who do in the U.S. Moreover, of that ten per cent, the vast majority go to one of India's seventeen thousand colleges, many of which are closer to community colleges than to four-year institutions. India does have more than three hundred universities,but a recent survey by the London Times Higher Education Supplement put only two of them among the top hundred in the world. Many Indian graduates therefore enter the workforce with a low level of skills. A current study led by Vivek Wadhwa, of Duke University, has found that if you define "engineer" by U.S. standards, India produces just a hundred and seventy thousand engineers a year, not four hundred thousand. Infosys says that, of 1.3 million applicants for jobs last year, it found only two per cent acceptable.
According to the passage, why India does not have enough skilled labour?

A

The total amount of young population is low

B

The total number of colleges are insufficient

C

Students do not want to study

D

Maximum universities and colleges do not match global standards

Q6

Q6 Directions for the (6-8) questions:
Read the passage given below and answer the questions.
India lives in several centuries at the same time. Somehow we manage to progress and regress simultaneously. As a nation we age by pushing outward from the middle--adding a few centuries on either end of the extraordinary CV. We greaten like the maturing head of a hammerhead shark with eyes looking in diametrically opposite directions.
I don't mean to put a simplistic value judgment on this peculiar form of "progress" by suggesting that Modern is Good and Traditional is Bad--or vice versa. What's hard to reconcile oneself to, both personally and politically, is the schizophrenic nature of it. That applies not just to the ancient/modern conundrum but to the utter illogic of what appears to be the current national enterprise. In the lane behind my house, every night I walk past road gangs of emaciated laborers digging a trench to lay fiber- optic cables to speed up our digital revolution. In the bitter winter cold, they work by the light of a few candles.
It's as though the people of India have been rounded up and loaded onto two convoys of trucks (a huge big one and a tiny little one) that have set off resolutely in opposite directions. The tiny convoy is on its way to a glittering destination somewhere near the top of the world. The other convoy just melts into the darkness and disappears. A cursory survey that tallies the caste, class and religion of who gets to be on which convoy would make a good Lazy Person's concise Guide to the History of India.
Sixty years after independence, India is still struggling with the legacy of colonialism, still flinching from the "cultural insult." As citizens we're still caught up in the business of "disproving" the white world's definition of us. Intellectually and emotionally, we have just begun to grapple with communal and caste politics that threaten to tear our society apart. But meanwhile, something new looms on our horizon. On the face of it, it's just ordinary, day-to-day business. It lacks the drama, the large-format, epic magnificence of war or genocide or famine. It's dull in comparison. It makes bad TV. It has to do with boring things like jobs, money, water supply, electricity, irrigation. But it also has to do with a process of barbaric dispossession on a scale that has few parallels in history. You may have guessed by now that I'm talking about the modern version of globalization.
What is globalization? Who is it for? What is it going to do to a country like India, in which social inequality has been institutionalized in the caste system for centuries? Is the corporatization and globalization of agriculture, water supply, electricity and essential commodities going to pull India out of the stagnant morass of poverty, illiteracy and religious bigotry? Is the dismantling and auctioning off of elaborate public sector infrastructure, developed with public money over the past sixty years, really the way forward? Is globalization going to close the gap between the privileged and the underprivileged, between the upper castes and the lower castes, between the educated and the illiterate? Or is it going to give those who already have a centuries-old head start a friendly helping hand? These are huge, contentious questions. The answers vary depending on whether they come from the villages and fields of rural India, from the slums and shantytowns of urban India, from the living rooms of the burgeoning middle class or from the boardrooms of the big business houses.
Why does the author calls 'progress' as peculiar?

A

Because modern is good and traditional is bad

B

Because of its unbalanced nature

C

Because it differs politically and personally

D

None of these

Q7

Q7 Directions for the (6-8) questions:
Read the passage given below and answer the questions.
India lives in several centuries at the same time. Somehow we manage to progress and regress simultaneously. As a nation we age by pushing outward from the middle--adding a few centuries on either end of the extraordinary CV. We greaten like the maturing head of a hammerhead shark with eyes looking in diametrically opposite directions.
I don't mean to put a simplistic value judgment on this peculiar form of "progress" by suggesting that Modern is Good and Traditional is Bad--or vice versa. What's hard to reconcile oneself to, both personally and politically, is the schizophrenic nature of it. That applies not just to the ancient/modern conundrum but to the utter illogic of what appears to be the current national enterprise. In the lane behind my house, every night I walk past road gangs of emaciated laborers digging a trench to lay fiber- optic cables to speed up our digital revolution. In the bitter winter cold, they work by the light of a few candles.
It's as though the people of India have been rounded up and loaded onto two convoys of trucks (a huge big one and a tiny little one) that have set off resolutely in opposite directions. The tiny convoy is on its way to a glittering destination somewhere near the top of the world. The other convoy just melts into the darkness and disappears. A cursory survey that tallies the caste, class and religion of who gets to be on which convoy would make a good Lazy Person's concise Guide to the History of India.
Sixty years after independence, India is still struggling with the legacy of colonialism, still flinching from the "cultural insult." As citizens we're still caught up in the business of "disproving" the white world's definition of us. Intellectually and emotionally, we have just begun to grapple with communal and caste politics that threaten to tear our society apart. But meanwhile, something new looms on our horizon. On the face of it, it's just ordinary, day-to-day business. It lacks the drama, the large-format, epic magnificence of war or genocide or famine. It's dull in comparison. It makes bad TV. It has to do with boring things like jobs, money, water supply, electricity, irrigation. But it also has to do with a process of barbaric dispossession on a scale that has few parallels in history. You may have guessed by now that I'm talking about the modern version of globalization.
What is globalization? Who is it for? What is it going to do to a country like India, in which social inequality has been institutionalized in the caste system for centuries? Is the corporatization and globalization of agriculture, water supply, electricity and essential commodities going to pull India out of the stagnant morass of poverty, illiteracy and religious bigotry? Is the dismantling and auctioning off of elaborate public sector infrastructure, developed with public money over the past sixty years, really the way forward? Is globalization going to close the gap between the privileged and the underprivileged, between the upper castes and the lower castes, between the educated and the illiterate? Or is it going to give those who already have a centuries-old head start a friendly helping hand? These are huge, contentious questions. The answers vary depending on whether they come from the villages and fields of rural India, from the slums and shantytowns of urban India, from the living rooms of the burgeoning middle class or from the boardrooms of the big business houses.
What do you infer from the sentence, “For some of us, life in …...but emotionally and intellectually”?

A

A person has one leg in one truck and the other in the second truck

B

A person meets with an accident

C

The nation is moving in two different directions

D

The nation is suffering from many road accidents

Q8

Q8 Directions for the (6-8) questions:
Read the passage given below and answer the questions.
India lives in several centuries at the same time. Somehow we manage to progress and regress simultaneously. As a nation we age by pushing outward from the middle--adding a few centuries on either end of the extraordinary CV. We greaten like the maturing head of a hammerhead shark with eyes looking in diametrically opposite directions.
I don't mean to put a simplistic value judgment on this peculiar form of "progress" by suggesting that Modern is Good and Traditional is Bad--or vice versa. What's hard to reconcile oneself to, both personally and politically, is the schizophrenic nature of it. That applies not just to the ancient/modern conundrum but to the utter illogic of what appears to be the current national enterprise. In the lane behind my house, every night I walk past road gangs of emaciated laborers digging a trench to lay fiber- optic cables to speed up our digital revolution. In the bitter winter cold, they work by the light of a few candles.
It's as though the people of India have been rounded up and loaded onto two convoys of trucks (a huge big one and a tiny little one) that have set off resolutely in opposite directions. The tiny convoy is on its way to a glittering destination somewhere near the top of the world. The other convoy just melts into the darkness and disappears. A cursory survey that tallies the caste, class and religion of who gets to be on which convoy would make a good Lazy Person's concise Guide to the History of India.
Sixty years after independence, India is still struggling with the legacy of colonialism, still flinching from the "cultural insult." As citizens we're still caught up in the business of "disproving" the white world's definition of us. Intellectually and emotionally, we have just begun to grapple with communal and caste politics that threaten to tear our society apart. But meanwhile, something new looms on our horizon. On the face of it, it's just ordinary, day-to-day business. It lacks the drama, the large-format, epic magnificence of war or genocide or famine. It's dull in comparison. It makes bad TV. It has to do with boring things like jobs, money, water supply, electricity, irrigation. But it also has to do with a process of barbaric dispossession on a scale that has few parallels in history. You may have guessed by now that I'm talking about the modern version of globalization.
What is globalization? Who is it for? What is it going to do to a country like India, in which social inequality has been institutionalized in the caste system for centuries? Is the corporatization and globalization of agriculture, water supply, electricity and essential commodities going to pull India out of the stagnant morass of poverty, illiteracy and religious bigotry? Is the dismantling and auctioning off of elaborate public sector infrastructure, developed with public money over the past sixty years, really the way forward? Is globalization going to close the gap between the privileged and the underprivileged, between the upper castes and the lower castes, between the educated and the illiterate? Or is it going to give those who already have a centuries-old head start a friendly helping hand? These are huge, contentious questions. The answers vary depending on whether they come from the villages and fields of rural India, from the slums and shantytowns of urban India, from the living rooms of the burgeoning middle class or from the boardrooms of the big business houses.
How does the author feel about 'Globalisation' in India?

A

Curious

B

Hopeless

C

Enthusiastic

D

Speculative

Q9

Q9 Directions for the (9-10) question:
Read the passage given below and answer the questions.
Sixty years ago, on the evening of August 14, 1947, a few hours before Britain's Indian Empire was formally divided into the nation-states of India and Pakistan, Lord Louis Mountbatten and his wife, Edwina, sat down in the vice-regal mansion in New Delhi to watch the latest Bob Hope movie, "My Favorite Brunette." Large parts of the subcontinent were descending into chaos, as the implications of partitioning the Indian Empire along religious lines became clear to the millions of Hindus, Muslims, and Sikhs caught on the wrong side of the border. In the next few months, some twelve million people would be uprooted and as many as a million murdered. But on that night in mid-August the bloodbath-and the fuller consequences of hasty imperial retreat-still lay in the future, and the Mountbattens probably felt they had earned their evening's entertainment.
While the Mountbattens were sitting down to their Bob Hope movie, India's constituent assembly was convening in New Delhi. The moment demanded grandiloquence, and Jawaharlal Nehru, Gandhi's closest disciple and soon to be India's first Prime Minister, provided it. "Long years ago, we made a tryst with destiny," he said. "At the stroke of the midnight hour, while the world sleeps, India will awaken to life and freedom. A moment comes, which comes but rarely in history, when we step out from the old to the new, when an age ends, and when the soul of a nation, long suppressed, finds utterance.“
Posterity has enshrined this speech, as Nehru clearly intended. But today his quaint phrase "tryst with destiny" resonates ominously, so enduring have been the political and psychological scars of partition. The souls of the two new nation-states immediately found utterance in brutal enmity. In Punjab, armed vigilante groups, organized along religious lines and incited by local politicians, murdered countless people, abducting and raping thousands of women. Soon, India and Pakistan were fighting a war-the first of three-over the disputed territory of Kashmir. Gandhi, reduced to despair by the seemingly endless cycle of retaliatory mass murders and displacement, was shot dead in January, 1948, by a Hindu extremist who believed that the father of the Indian nation was too soft on Muslims. Jinnah, racked with tuberculosis and overwork, died a few months later, his dream of a secular Pakistan apparently buried with him.
What could ‘grandiloquence’ possibly mean as inferred from the context in which it has been used in the passage?

A

Grand party

B

Celebrations

C

Lofty Speech

D

Destiny

Q10

Q10 Directions for the (9-10) question:
Read the passage given below and answer the questions.
Sixty years ago, on the evening of August 14, 1947, a few hours before Britain's Indian Empire was formally divided into the nation-states of India and Pakistan, Lord Louis Mountbatten and his wife, Edwina, sat down in the vice-regal mansion in New Delhi to watch the latest Bob Hope movie, "My Favorite Brunette." Large parts of the subcontinent were descending into chaos, as the implications of partitioning the Indian Empire along religious lines became clear to the millions of Hindus, Muslims, and Sikhs caught on the wrong side of the border. In the next few months, some twelve million people would be uprooted and as many as a million murdered. But on that night in mid-August the bloodbath-and the fuller consequences of hasty imperial retreat-still lay in the future, and the Mountbattens probably felt they had earned their evening's entertainment.
While the Mountbattens were sitting down to their Bob Hope movie, India's constituent assembly was convening in New Delhi. The moment demanded grandiloquence, and Jawaharlal Nehru, Gandhi's closest disciple and soon to be India's first Prime Minister, provided it. "Long years ago, we made a tryst with destiny," he said. "At the stroke of the midnight hour, while the world sleeps, India will awaken to life and freedom. A moment comes, which comes but rarely in history, when we step out from the old to the new, when an age ends, and when the soul of a nation, long suppressed, finds utterance.“
Posterity has enshrined this speech, as Nehru clearly intended. But today his quaint phrase "tryst with destiny" resonates ominously, so enduring have been the political and psychological scars of partition. The souls of the two new nation-states immediately found utterance in brutal enmity. In Punjab, armed vigilante groups, organized along religious lines and incited by local politicians, murdered countless people, abducting and raping thousands of women. Soon, India and Pakistan were fighting a war-the first of three-over the disputed territory of Kashmir. Gandhi, reduced to despair by the seemingly endless cycle of retaliatory mass murders and displacement, was shot dead in January, 1948, by a Hindu extremist who believed that the father of the Indian nation was too soft on Muslims. Jinnah, racked with tuberculosis and overwork, died a few months later, his dream of a secular Pakistan apparently buried with him.
Why was Mahatma Gandhi assassinated?

A

Because he was favouring the Muslims

B

His assassin thought he was partial to the Muslims

C

He got killed in the violence after partition

D

None of these

Q11

Q11 Select the correct option that fills the blank to make the sentence meaningfully complete.
A person's shadow always ______ beside him/her, no matter what.

A

is

B

stays

C

walks

D

be

Q12

Q12 Directions for the (12-13) questions:
Read the passage given below and answer the questions.
When it came to promoting its new video-game console, the Wii, in America, Nintendo recruited a handful of carefully chosen suburban mothers in the hope that they would spread the word among their friends that the Wii was a gaming console the whole family could enjoy together. Nintendo thus became the latest company to use "word-of-mouth" marketing. Nestlé, Sony and Philips have all launched similar campaigns in recent months to promote everything from bottled water to electric toothbrushes. As the power of traditional advertising declines, what was once an experimental marketing approach is becoming more popular.
After all, no form of advertising carries as much weight as an endorsement from a friend. "Amway and Tupperware know you can blend the social and economic to business advantage," says Walter Carl, a marketing guru at Northeastern University. The difference now, he says, is that the internet can magnify the effect of such endorsements. Last week BzzAgent launched its service in Britain. Dave Balter, BzzAgent's founder, thinks word-of-mouth marketing will become a multi-billion dollar industry. No doubt he tells that to everyone he meets.
The difficulty for marketers is creating the right kind of buzz and learning to control it. Negative views spread just as quickly as positive ones, so if a product has flaws, people will soon find out. And Peter Kim of Forrester, a consultancy, points out that when Microsoft sent laptops loaded with its new Windows Vista software to influential bloggers in an effort to get them to write about it, the resulting online discussion ignored Vista and focused instead on the morality of accepting gifts and the ethics of word-of-mouth marketing. Bad buzz, in short.
BzzAgent, a controversial company based in Boston that is one of the leading exponents of word-of-mouth marketing, operates a network of volunteer "agents" who receive free samples of products in the post. They talk to their friends about them and send back their thoughts. In return, they receive rewards through a points program-an arrangement they are supposed to make clear. This allows a firm to create buzz around a product and to see what kind of word-of-mouth response it generates, which can be useful for subsequent product development and marketing.
What is the experimental approach being discussed in the first paragraph?

A

Word of mouth marketing

B

Selling of video-game consoles, bottled water and electric toothbrushes

C

Traditional advertising

D

None of the above

Q13

Q13 Directions for the (12-13) questions:
Read the passage given below and answer the questions.
When it came to promoting its new video-game console, the Wii, in America, Nintendo recruited a handful of carefully chosen suburban mothers in the hope that they would spread the word among their friends that the Wii was a gaming console the whole family could enjoy together. Nintendo thus became the latest company to use "word-of-mouth" marketing. Nestlé, Sony and Philips have all launched similar campaigns in recent months to promote everything from bottled water to electric toothbrushes. As the power of traditional advertising declines, what was once an experimental marketing approach is becoming more popular.
After all, no form of advertising carries as much weight as an endorsement from a friend. "Amway and Tupperware know you can blend the social and economic to business advantage," says Walter Carl, a marketing guru at Northeastern University. The difference now, he says, is that the internet can magnify the effect of such endorsements. Last week BzzAgent launched its service in Britain. Dave Balter, BzzAgent's founder, thinks word-of-mouth marketing will become a multi-billion dollar industry. No doubt he tells that to everyone he meets.
The difficulty for marketers is creating the right kind of buzz and learning to control it. Negative views spread just as quickly as positive ones, so if a product has flaws, people will soon find out. And Peter Kim of Forrester, a consultancy, points out that when Microsoft sent laptops loaded with its new Windows Vista software to influential bloggers in an effort to get them to write about it, the resulting online discussion ignored Vista and focused instead on the morality of accepting gifts and the ethics of word-of-mouth marketing. Bad buzz, in short.
BzzAgent, a controversial company based in Boston that is one of the leading exponents of word-of-mouth marketing, operates a network of volunteer "agents" who receive free samples of products in the post. They talk to their friends about them and send back their thoughts. In return, they receive rewards through a points program-an arrangement they are supposed to make clear. This allows a firm to create buzz around a product and to see what kind of word-of-mouth response it generates, which can be useful for subsequent product development and marketing.
What is the author of the passage most likely to agree with?

A

Social networking has benefited corporate sector to a large extent.

B

Social networking is not useful for corporate sector.

C

Social networking may benefit the corporate sector to some extent.

D

None of the above

Q14

Q14 Select the option that is most nearly OPPOSITE to the given word.
Empathy

A

Care

B

Sympathy

C

Discontent

D

Apathy

Q15

Q15 Rearrange the sentences given as P, Q, R and S to form a coherent paragraph. The first (S1) and the last (S6) sentences are given.
S1: The physics exam paper was quite tough this year.
P: The physics test paper is now being designed by some junior teacher.
Q: Thus, has asked all failed students to appear for exam again.
R: Only 40% of the total students scored the passing marks.
S: The principal was quite disappointed with this result.
S6: Hopefully the school will have higher passing percentage this time.

A

SPRQ

B

QSRP

C

RSQP

D

PSQR

Q16

Q16 Read the passage given below and answer the questions.
Today, China's official unemployment rate is about 4.3 percent, but it is a gross underestimate because of underemployment among both rural and urban Chinese. They may have a job but their skills are underutilized and they are underpaid. What explains this situation? No doubt, the global economic crisis has contributed to job loss, but China is considered one of the first economies to have recovered from the recession.
Instead, three explanations may account for the relatively high unemployment among college graduates. First, geography matters. Young people from smaller places and rural areas, upon obtaining a university degree, are likely to be eager to go to or stay in big cities. This effect is crowding the labor market in cities like Beijing and Shanghai and hurting the economy of small cities and towns. Second, globalization matters. By rough estimates, one quarter of the Chinese who have studied overseas have returned. Nicknamed "Sea Turtles" (Haigui), these returnees are highly competitive and can easily push the domestic college graduates down the job hierarchy.
Finally, China's economy continues to be dominated by the industrial sector, which accounts for about 49 percent of the gross domestic product. While services - the most likely sector for college graduates - account for about 40 percent of the G.D.P., high-skilled, professional jobs are still relatively few compared with low-end service jobs like those in sales.
Creating high-end jobs and increasing the incentives for young people to live in smaller cities are obvious ways to reduce unemployment. But this is easier said than done. The Chinese economy is no longer centrally planned, and as we have observed on the other side of the Pacific, relying on the market alone - even with stimulus packages - has not yet put enough people back to work.
Which is the best measure to reduce unemployment?

A

Effective co-ordination between government and market

B

Central planning of the economy is required

C

In-depth analysis of current economic situation

D

Providing job opportunities in small towns

Q17

Q17 Read the sentence to find out whether there is any grammatical error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The letter of that part is the answer. Ignore the error of punctuation, if any.
(A) Fishermen is (B) spotted catching fish on (C) the bank of the river.

A

(A)

B

(B)

C

(C)

D

No error

Q18

Q18 Select the word or phrase which best expresses the MEANING of the given word.
Arid

A

Dry

B

Separated

C

Arrogant

D

Superfluous

Q19

Q19 Select the word or phrase which best expresses the MEANING of the given word.
Tranquil

A

Disturbing

B

Agitated

C

Numb

D

Calm

Q20

Q20 Select the word or phrase which best expresses the MEANING of the given word.
Recluse

A

Related

B

Included

C

Different

D

Solitary

Q21

Q21 Select the option that is most nearly OPPOSITE in meaning to the given word.
Splendid

A

Unimpressive

B

Bad

C

Ugly

D

Radiant

Q22

Q22 Select the correct option that fills the blank to make the sentence meaningfully complete.
The origin of Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD), as believed by many medical experts can be congenital, whereas others believe it to be _____.

A

Exogenous

B

Deleterious

C

Pathological

D

Environmental

Q23

Q23 A woman is facing South. She turns 45॰ in the clockwise direction and then 35॰ in the anti-clockwise direction. Which direction is she facing now?

A

North - East

B

North - West

C

South - West

D

South - East

Q24

Q24 If the Time is 6 o’clock, then hour hand is at South and minute hand is at North. If time is 8.30, where will hour hand and minute hand be?

A

North – East, South

B

South – East, South

C

North – West, South

D

South - West, South

Q25

Q25 Find the odd man out:
FJN, HLO, CGK, KOS

A

FJN

B

HLO

C

CGK

D

KOS

Q26

Q26 Given signs signify something and on that basis, assume the given statement to be true. Then: A/B, B/C implies

A

A X B

B

A/C

C

A + B

D

None of these

Q27

Q27 Sahitya is standing at point A facing North. She walks 50 m to her right and takes a left turn and walks another 40 m. Then she walks 30 m to her left again and then 20 m to her right. In which direction is she standing from her starting point?

A

North - East

B

North - West

C

North

D

South - West

Q28

Q28 Who is son of Rohit?
Statement 1: Sangitha is sister of Manoj.
Statement 2: Rohit's daughter is Sangitha.

A

I alone is sufficient while II alone is not sufficient

B

II alone is sufficient while I alone is not sufficient

C

Both I and II together are sufficient

D

Neither I nor Il is sufficient

Q29

Q29 A man travels 3 km to the west, turns left and goes 3 km, turns right and goes 1 km. How far is he from the starting point?

A

7 km

B

6 km

C

5 km

D

4 km

Q30

Q30 Convert binary number 10101 into decimal number system?

A

21

B

30

C

50

D

63

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